Madebypin.com

I haven’t posted in a week or so because ….I’ve been making a new website.  You can now find me at www.madebypin.com.  I hope you enjoy the new look – my first post on the new site will be how to make some delicious Vanilla Extract.

I’ve been looking for a way to transfer my followers to the new site but this apparently is not possible so, if you’ve been following me here or you would like to start following me, then please make your way over to http://www.madebypin.com and sign up for emails – look for the ‘subscribe’ button on the right of the screen.

April 5, 2012. Tags: , , , . Food & Drink. Leave a comment.

‘Stack and Whack’ Quilt – guest post by CraftyRoo!

hello!

Crafty Roo bringing you this week’s make – a stack and whack play quilt for a baby.

I have been making quilts for some time and wanted to try a new method.  I had a birthday last week and received many crafty books, one of which was Kirstie Allsop’s Craft.  In this book, one of the first projects is a stack and whack quilt.  It looked quite easy and interested and I wanted to see if I could use this technique as opposed to cutting blocks or strips which is how I usually piece my quilts.

Anyway, the book suggested making a template. I didn’t do this and wanted to get straight on with my cutting.  I made a stack of five fabrics.  I then cut two squares through all five layers, each six inches by six inches.  Then I made four cuts into each square, giving five smaller piles of fabric for each square (10 in total).  I labelled these carefully.  Each pile of fabric was cut slighly differently, giving different shapes.


You then leave pile one as it is, take one piece the top of from pile two and put it on the bottom, take two from pile three and put it on the bottom, take three from pile four and put them on the bottom, put four from pile five on the bottom.  Do this carefully and you will end up with five unique squares. Sew these together so you end up with ten complete squares.

Lay these out so that no two of the same  fabrics are next to each other.  You will have one square left over, which you can use on the back, if you like, or to make a matching cushion.

If I was going to do it again, I would cut bigger squares to start off with.  Using only six by six squares made it very fiddly!

That is as far as I’ve got! I’ll try to update this with my next steps.

March 14, 2012. Tags: , , , , , . Fabric. 1 comment.

57. Valentine Card

Some days crafty things just don’t go right. I was full of enthusiasm to make some Valentines cards and had found one online that I thought I would have a try at making.

Take a look at this one

Gorgeous and relatively simple, I thought.

Not so fast…

I gathered the equipment together

and marked out the lettering.

Then I carefully cut around the solid lines and folding at the dashed lines.  This took a while.  I was engrossed in listening to Danny Baker on the radio that was mistake number 1! I wasn’t concentrating on the card and glued the wrong side of the cut out piece:

How can I fix this? – mistake number 2. I should have put it in the bin at this point.  I decided to put glitter on the glue and make it look like I meant to cover the front with glue.

The pot of glitter had not been opened before and was covered in tape. I took much too long trying to get it open – mistake number 3. By the time I had finally got into the glitter the glue was almost dry.

But I carried on – mistake number 4. Glued it to the card and found that I had cut the heart too big so it didn’t fold properly – mistake number 5.

At this point I decided to try making a different card.

This one is much simpler.

Cut 2 hearts the same size from some pretty paper. The picture below shows enough for 3 cards.

Here comes mistake number 6.  I had drawn the heart shape on the reverse of the design and found when I turned it over that I had missed the design in some places – the white stripes in the picture above.

Stick one heart to the front of the card.

Then stitch the matching sized heart on top of this one.

If you look closely you will see mistake number 7.  I accidentally got some purple pen marks on the large top heart and had to disguise it by going around the whole heart with a purple outline.

As I made these 3 cards, I refined the method.  On the last one, I glued some tissue paper to the reverse side of the top heart which hid the print on the underside.

I also made mistake number 8…as I was finishing off the stitches on one of the cards, I snipped off the thread too close to the card and cut off the knot I had carefully made to secure the stitching so the inside has a loose end.  If I had more time and wasn’t making so many mistakes today, I would cover the stitching on the inside with another layer of card in a contrasting colour but I’m going to stop while I’m ahead.

February 14, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , . Paper, recycled. 1 comment.

56. Apron

I’ve been meaning to make an apron for a long time as mine were looking particularly scruffy.  Luckily some very nice people saw them, took pity on me and made me some so I didn’t have to.  One of them even has Made For Pin appliqued on to the front.

However, after coming across quite a few people who wanted to learn to sew, I decided to put on a class at the library where the participants could learn and sew an apron at the same time.  It was lots of fun, if a bit frantic at times, with varying types of machines and all different sorts of bobbins and threading systems.

Here is what we did:

Start with 1m of fabric.

I used a lovely Ashley Wilde cotton twill fabric that is 143cm wide.  I bought it at the fantastic Fabric Warehouse.

If you are using fabric that is narrower then buy extra length for the straps and pocket if you want one.

We started by folding the fabric lengthwise so that the selvedges were parallel.

Fold one side in so that the folded fabric measures 33cm from fold to selvedge.

Measure 5cm down from top of fabric and draw a 16cm line from the fold towards the selvedge.  If you don’t want to mark the outside of your fabric, turn so the right sides are together.

I cut out a plastic guide for the next step but you could equally draw freehand or use a large curve like a round tray or something similar to draw out the armhole. Draw the curve from the end of your 16cm line to the selvedge. Make another straight line from the top of the curve to the top edge of the fabric.

Cut out from the top of the fabric along your last line, around the curve of the armhole and then straight down staying close to the selvedge.

If you have used a 1m length of fabric then just cut to the other end of the fabric.

Now cut 3 ties from the remaining fabric.  Make them not less than 4 cm wide and as long as you need.

Press each tie so that one short edge and both long edges are folded towards the middle, then fold and press in half lengthwise so all the raw edges are hidden.

Press the raw edges around the whole apron in and then fold over again and press  to hide the edge. Fold the top over at the line you made and press.

Stitch all the pressed  straps and apron edges starting at the left underarm, up the left armhole, across the top and down the right armhole.

Once you turn to go down the right side, stop to add a tie. Tuck the open end of the tie under the folded and pressed side seam and fold over on itself like this:

Continue stitching over the top of the tie, down the right side, along the hem and up the left side.  When you get to the same place on the left side as you placed the tie on the right, stop and add a second tie.  Continue stitching over the top of this tie up to the bottom of the left armhole where you started.

Measure and cut the third tie to the length you need for around your neck.  Sew the two ends to the inside top of the apron equidistant from the armhole edge.

If you have any fabric left you can cut out a pocket, fold and press the raw edges.  Stitch along the top edge then pin to the front of your apron. Stitch in place around the 3 remaining unstitched sides (assuming you’ve cut a rectangular pocket).

January 30, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , , . Fabric. Leave a comment.

55. Word Bird

It has been a hectic week so far.  I realised this morning that I didn’t have a make ready to publish so decided to take an hour out this afternoon to get one ready.  I enjoyed making this so much that I forgot to take photographs at each stage and totally lost track of time. That must be a sign of a good make.

The directions for this make are by Ann Ellis in the January/February 2012 issue of Cloth Paper Scissors

I started by roughly drawing a body, wing and beak shape on cardboard as Ann suggests.

Then I cut the shapes out:

and this is where I got lost in a dream of tissue paper and glue and forgot to take any more photographs.

The steps are very simple: tear up tissue paper, stick it to the body, wing and beak. Then embellish.

Attach the finished bird to a skewer or other handy stick and admire.

January 26, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , . Paper, recycled. 3 comments.

54. Lion Hat – guest post by Sierra Lima November

This is a guest post from Sierra Lima November

This Christmas, I decided to make all the presents to give to my friends and family.  This spilled over into January. Some time ago, my brother had a Lion Hat which got lost/given away, so I decided to make one to replace it for his birthday.

Here’s how I made it.

1. First I got my brother’s girlfriend to measure his head.  She did a great job of measuring while he was asleep.

2.  Then I got a pattern from the excellent website www.fleecefun.com and thought about how I could modify it to make the Lion Hat I wanted to make.  The pattern itself can be found at http://www.fleecefun.com/halloween-hat-pack.html .

3.  I then had to decide whether the Lion had more bear-like ears or more cat-like. With the help of one of my son’s toys, I decided they were more bear-like.

4.  Then cutting the pieces.  I added for the lion some triangles of felt for the mane.

5. I then sewed all the layers together

6. Then I pinned and sewed the bottom, which was actually really cool as it made the mane stand up.

7. The final hat….

Thank you so much to www.fleecefun.com   for the original pattern – it is amazing and so easy to make and for allowing me to post this with my modifications!

Here is the hat in action on the slopes in France

January 18, 2012. Tags: , , , , , , , , . Fabric. Leave a comment.

51. Fabric Bag With Lots of Pockets

I cleared out my fabric stash cupboard this week and found quite a few projects that were started but not finished. Fortunately, not as many as there were at the beginning of the year and not all of them are mine. However, when I tried to give them back to their creators, they were all returned with, ‘oh, you can finish it or make it into something’ Some even denied having anything to do with them. (Could this be next year’s blog?)

This week’s make was a project I started ages ago.  I was going to make a matching cushion for some curtains I had made. You can tell how long ago this project was started by the fact that the curtains were put on freecycle last year and are long gone.

I still like the fabric and as I’d already quilted a huge piece of it, I decided to make it into a bag with lots of pockets.  It might be useful as a diaper/nappy bag or for lugging around crafting bits and pieces. The piece I’ve started with is a rectangle measuring 92cm x 41cm.

So, I finished the quilting off then added a pocket to the inside.  For this I folded a piece of contrasting fabric 25cm x 25cm in half, and sewed it to the inside of the bag along 3 sides. I then made this into 2 pockets by stitching along its height with contrasting thread.

Then I started to make the pockets on the outside.  This turned out to be a bit trial and error as I was making up how to do it as I went along.

For a large front pocket, the yellow one below, I used 2 squares of fabric 25cm x 25cm.  Sewed them right sides together on 3 sides, turned them right side out and sewed the top closed with contrasting stitching.

Then I made a run of pockets around the bottom of the bag using  a strip of the main fabric, 106cm x 40cm. I folded the strip in half lengthwise and placed the open edges along the bottom of the bag.  As this strip is slightly wider than the bag, I pinned it in place so that the pockets stuck out a bit like pouches. Hopefully this will mean that it will hold bulky items. At the front, I made a pleat in the strip in the hope that it might lie flat when nothing is in that pocket.

I then sewed the strip to the main part of the bag attaching it at the sides and bottom.

(The pocket didn’t lie flat so I slipped a piece of elastic into the top fold.)

I made the straps by using two strips of fabric folded over some batting and then stitching along the length.

I also used an old duffle coat toggle to the front and crocheted a strip of yarn as a loop fastening.

I was going to add this to the blog as make number 46 but have decided to give it to one of my lovely daughters so will save this make and publish it after Christmas.  As it is now Friday, I’m going to have to make something very quickly to get it in for this week.

December 29, 2011. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , . Fabric. Leave a comment.

35. Paper Weaving

For this week’s make I’m going back to card making, this time with a paper weaving theme.

First of all find some interesting and colourful pictures that you can cut up.

I used an old calendar – sorry about the flash in this photograph.

Then cut the page into 1cm wide strips.  I used a guillotine as it was quick and easy.

Interweave the strips under and over each other.

Once you are happy with the size, shape and design, glue the front of a piece of folded card and stick on the woven paper.

September 8, 2011. Tags: , , , , . Paper, recycled. Leave a comment.

More Year Long Creative Projects


365: A Daily Creativity Journal
Noah Scalin’s book offers 365 project prompts to kick start your creativity, plus plenty of room for journaling, sketching, and jotting down ideas. Learn how to choose your subject and document your work, and see examples from other artists and crafters who took the 365 challenge. In addition, master new techniques to incorporate into your projects, including quilling, clay-making, paper pop-up engineering, and more.

His blog,  Make Something Every Day and Change Your Life offers even more inspiring, year long creative projects and is featuring madebypin this week : )  thank you, Noah!

May 13, 2011. Tags: , , . Books. Leave a comment.

17. Needle Felted Purse

This make came about because I wanted to make something special for a dear friend’s daughter’s 21st birthday. I’ve been waiting to post this until today as this is her birthday and I wanted to make sure that she opened it before she read how to make it!

I learned how to needle felt from Val who also showed me how to make paper. So far I’ve made many brooches and a couple of pictures but I wanted to make Lily something new and different.

I started off with a piece of soft felt roughly 48cm x 24cm.

Then using a needle felting tool I felted in some ‘Oliver Twist Silk Fibres’ (I bought these from Rainbow Silks – a treasure trove of beautiful creative supplies in Great Missenden, Buckinghamshire – it’s next door to the Roald Dahl Museum if you want to make a day of it. They also do mail order if a trip isn’t possible.)

After I got the fibres in place, I sewed on some yarn and beads. (Scroll down for a picture.)

Once the decoration was all in place I cut a piece of lining fabric slightly larger than the piece of felt all the way around the rectangle.

For this purse I found a piece of beautiful, fine cotton Liberty print in my stash.

I pinned the lining to the felt, right sides together so that the lining would show slightly on the two shorter sides.

I then sewed the lining to the felt around 3 sides (the two longer sides and the short side just below the felted design). After turning right side out,  I closed the fourth edge by folding the lining over the felt slightly and hemming in place.


I then folded the fabric in three making a purse with flap and sewed up the sides of the purse part.

I used velcro to close the flap to the purse part.

At this point, I looked at the purse and thought, ‘This isn’t what I had in mind for Lily. Start again!’

I used black felt this time and followed the colours of the lining for the felting and beading.  I also added a label inside with her name and today’s date that I printed on fabric using Bubble Jet Set (more of this technique to come).

Happy birthday Lily!

May 11, 2011. Tags: , , , , , , , . Fabric. 1 comment.

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